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or not the republicans will move away from the ideologically rigid position which has been the grover/norquist pledge which most of them signed that they will not go for additional revenues. >> reporter: for the first time, even the anti-tax pledge appears to be negotiable. several republicans are indicating they're open to breaking that promise. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece and republicans should put revenue on the table. >> reporter: but new revenue doesn't necessarily mean new taxes. >> i would be very much opposed to raising tax rates. but i do believe we can close a lot of loopholes. >> reporter: and democrats say just closing loopholes and cutting deductions isn't enough. >> you've got to raise additional revenues, including tax rates on the wealthy. >> those have to go up? >> they have to go up. >> reporter: in any deal, republicans insist on big cuts to entitlement programs like medicare and social security. now taxes are getting all the attention right now but these talks also need to address the federal de
that no tax increase pledge that many of them signed, a pledge created by lobbyist grover norquist. house majority leader eric cantor, senator lindsey graham of south carolina and senator saxby chambliss of georgia all said there could be an increase in tax revenue if democrats agreed to controlling the cost of medicare and medicaid. >> there's a right way to do this and there's a wrong way to do it. but at the end of the day, nancy what's got to happen is whoever's right or wrong here we've got to get the economy going again. >> reporter: chambliss and virginia democrat mark warner head up the senate's gang of eight-- four democrats and four remembers who have worked for two and a half years to find a bipartisan approach to debt reduction. do you think your democratic colleagues are going to be willing to entertain discussion of social security reform, medicare reform as part of this deal? >> listen, i think anyone that looks at our entitlements, medicare, social security, other programs, they're great programs. but the math just doesn't work anymore. not because the programs are bad but
that they are not obligated to this anti-tax pledge they all signed by grover norquist. does that suggest we're closer to compromise? >> we're closer but it may only be measured with a mike kromtcrometer. the big deal, how do you get it? the president said he doesn't see a way to get it without raising those tax rates on the most healthy. republicans, even those inches towards compromise saying yes, for revenue, but don't want to see rates go up at all. then it gets into a counting question. how much money can you get through fixing the tax code? once you tinker with the tax code you invite swarms of lobbyists and a timing question. can you raise enough revenue through tweaking the tax code by the end of the year to get something done or do you have to do a shoert deal and the harder work of tax reform later? there's entitlements major mentioned. >> also momentum and having the results of an election. do you feel that there is a difference this time so that maybe they can push it over the hill? >> certainly in talking to white house officials, they say, you know elections have a
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